Virtual National Symposium 2020

CURRICULUM INNOVATION FOR TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING

FRN National Symposium 2020
November 19 & 20 at a Glance

 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2020
TIME EVENT
5:00 p.m.

6:30 p.m.
Welcome Remarks and Introductions
Dr. Charlton McIlwain, Vice Provost, New York University
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2020
TIME EVENT
9:00 a.m

9:15 a.m.
Brief Welcome
9:15 a.m.

10:00 a.m.

 
BREAKOUT SESSION 1

 

A. Creativity and Entrepreneurship = Design Thinking in the Classroom
Maritza Soto, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez

B. Transformative Learning through Curriculum Innovation, Mentored Research, and Inclusive Community-Building at Farmingdale State College
Beverly Kahn, Edwin Cabrera, and Kate Winter, Farmingdale State College

C. Transitioning from the F2F Environment to Remote Learning and “Forward” Again: Tips from an Instructional Designer
Rhonda McCoy, Paine College

D. Cura Personalis within Service Learning
Michael Finetti and Jay Garrels, St. Peter’s University

E. Critical & Creative Thinking for Engaged Learning
Robert DiYanni, New York University

F. Modality Change for Teaching Students in the Era of COVID-19
Alice Stephens, Clark Atlanta University
Rosalee Martin, Huston-Tillotson University
 

10:00 a.m.

10:15 a.m.
Break
10:15 a.m.

11:00 a.m.

 
BREAKOUT SESSION 2

 

A. Skills-Based General Education Reform: What Does a Student Get from a Course?
Nicholas Richardson and Amy Eshleman, Wagner College

B. Facilitating Cross-Disciplinary Learning from Entrepreneurial Inter-Disciplinary Projects
James Lawler, Anthony Joseph, and Arun Yegnaseshan, Pace University

C. Changing Strategies in Teaching for Transformative Learning
Iliana Ballester-Panelli and Alba J. Brugueras Fabre, Universidad del Sagrado Corazón

D. A Theme-Based Humanities Course on Climate Change
Julie O’Connell, Felician University

E. The Application of Economics through Podcasts and TED Talks in Principles of Microeconomics and Environmental Economics in a Team-Based Learning Setting
Jimena González-Ramirez, Manhattan College

F. Transforming a Social Justice and Diversity Course Through Critical Action Research in a Creative Learning Community
Sheila Gregory, Clark Atlanta University

11:00 a.m.

11:15 a.m.
Break
11:15 a.m.

12:00 p.m.

 
BREAKOUT SESSION 3

 

A. STEM into STEAM: Using Object-Based Learning to Develop Critical and Creative Thinking Among Students
Amanda Valdespino and Renee Evans, Miami University

B. Mapping, Marking, Modernizing: Teaching Goethe in the Modern Classroom
Sven Andersen, University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras

C. Connecting Content to the World outside the Classroom in Hybrid Classes
Chiara DiSanti, Farmingdale State College

D. Place-based, and Experiential, Learning: How Today’s Higher Education Faculty are Changing Their Pedagogical Strategies to Mirror the New Needs of Generation Z Learners
Corey Liberman, Catherine Cabeen, Bethany Elkin, Manolo Estavillo, Millie Falcaro, and Philip Meyers, Marymount Manhattan College

E. Students Challenges to Engage the Awareness of Human Resource Management Competencies Gap: Fostering Active Learning Tools
Carmen Figueroa, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez
Sandra Fonseca-Lind, Northcentral University

 

12:00 p.m.

1:00 p.m.
Lunch
1:00 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

 
POSTER SESSION

 

A. A Collaboration Across Chemistry and the Health Sciences to Enhance Forensic Science Interdisciplinary Learning
Amanda Harper-Leatherman and Linda Roney, Fairfield University

B. Promoting Collaboration in the Classroom
Kai Burkins and Dezette Johnson, Johnson C., Smith University

C. Transforming the Classroom in Response to the COVID-19 Emergency
Jeff Gaab and Richard Vogel, Farmingdale State College

 

1:30 p.m.

2:30 p.m.

 
ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION 1:

 

Higher Education in the Time of COVID
 

2:30 p.m.

2:45 p.m.
Break
2:45 p.m.

3:45 p.m.

 
ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION 2

 

What Can the FRN DO for You?
Introduction: Dr. Brian Torff , Fairfield University
 

3:45 p.m.

4:00 p.m.
 
CLOSING REMARKS
 
Dr. Charlton McIlwain, Vice Provost, New York University
 
4:00 p.m.

5:00 p.m.
Social Hour
Detailed Schedule
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2020
TIME EVENT
5:00 p.m.

6:30 p.m.
Welcome Remarks and Introductions
Dr. Charlton McIlwain, Vice Provost, New York University
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2020
TIME EVENT
9:00 a.m.

9:15 a.m.
Brief Welcome
9:15 a.m.

10:00 a.m.

 
BREAKOUT SESSION 1

 

A. Creativity & Entrepreneurship = Design Thinking in the Classroom
Maritza Soto, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez

Design Thinking is a mindset and approach to learning, collaboration, and problem solving. When put into practice, the process is a structured framework for identifying challenges, gathering information, generating potential solutions, refining ideas, and testing solutions. It is the basis for entrepreneurship. Through the steps of Design Thinking in the classroom – empathizing, defining, ideating, and prototyping – students become those entrepreneurs that can make a difference. This session presents the Design Thinking approach and develops a hands-on experience for participants to understand how to engage this approach in the classroom.

B. Transformative Learning through Curriculum Innovation, Mentored Research, and Inclusive Community-Building at Farmingdale State College
Beverly Kahn, Edwin Cabrera, and Kate Winter, Farmingdale State College

This presentation proposes that there is no single intervention that produces transformative education. It takes a multifaceted effort orchestrated by a capable and caring team. The Farmingdale Research Aligned Mentorship (RAM) program includes (1) curricular innovation (first-year seminars, collaborative learning workshops, introduction to research seminars), (2) powerful mentored research experiences where students engage in cutting-edge research on and off campus, (3) holistic counseling and mentoring through all four years, and (4) community-building programs and service-learning experiences that build strong bonds and create family amongst the students and RAM staff.

C. Transitioning from the F2F Environment to Remote Learning and “Forward” Again: Tips from an Instructional Designer
Rhonda McCoy, Paine College

The transition from the face-to-face classroom to the online learning environment was a tremendous shift for everyone. Having an instructional designer is key; how- ever, not all institutions have the budget for an instructional designer. Therefore, the challenge that sudden shifts make is even more impactful. One strategy to be shared is creating a humanized live class at the scheduled time while providing a recorded video for those unable to attend. In addition, a discussion of important aspects of teaching and learning in the online environment, to include instructional strategies and resources like software to record, edit, and upload lectures or create discussions and assessments, will be provided.

D. Cura Personalis within Service Learning
Michael Finetti and Jay Garrels, St. Peter’s University

This breakout session will explore what service learning is and how cura personalis, a motto that emphasizes caring for the entire person, guides service learning at Saint Peter’s University and helps to meet the goals of the mission. Service learning does, in many cases, include community-based work. However, the presenters will clarify that service learning is defined by the connection of the work to the curriculum, not just the work by itself. The presenters will define and provide the rationale that service learning is an extension of what is taught in a traditional face-to-face class or in an online course. The session will cover how service learning is built into the curriculum of our courses and satisfies student-learning outcomes. The presenters will discuss how effective service learning strategies can promote active learning for students. Lastly, the presenters will help facilitate conversations with session attendees about how they can use service learning in their classes and communities.

E. Critical & Creative Thinking for Engaged Learning
Robert DiYanni, New York University

Most college teachers hope to engage their students in thinking critically, and sometimes creatively, in response to assignments, activities, projects and other designed learning tasks in their courses. These goals, however, are not always easily accomplished, especially when teaching remotely. This workshop invites participants to identify successful teaching practices that help students develop and demonstrate their ability to think critically and creatively. Participants can expect to take away practical applications for fostering higher order thinking in both on-site and remote teaching environments.

F. Modality Change for Teaching Students in the Era of COVID-19
Alice Stephens, Clark Atlanta University
Rosalee Martin, Huston-Tillotson University

Face-to-face classrooms were thrust into online environments without notice or preparation. Moving to remote teaching and online instruction has been challenging for students as well as their teachers. Professors with limited knowledge and/or experience with online teaching were left to devise new ways to deliver best practice education in an online platform, a challenge especially for those senior professors who often had a large learning curve. However, necessity is often the best teacher. This session will offer examples of how two senior professors had to re-think, re-adjust and step up their game for innovative remote teaching as a nation sheltered in place.
 

10:00 a.m.

10:15 a.m.
Break
10:15 a.m.

11:00 a.m.

 
BREAKOUT SESSION 2

 

A. Skills-Based General Education Reform: What Does a Student Get from a Course?
Nicholas Richardson and Amy Eshleman, Wagner College

This session examines the obstacles and opportunities in implementing AAC&U’s ambitious LEAP Essential Learning Outcomes as the framework for designing a workable undergraduate curriculum the encourages students to see the value in taking courses outside their chosen major. The experience of Wagner College can be used as a case study to encourage participants to examine the extent to which their institution’s current general education curriculum is consistent with LEAP’s Essential Learning Outcomes, and to consider how LEAP’s framework can realistically be applied in a practical curriculum design. Primarily, discussion will focus on strategies participants might use to encourage faculty and administrators to adopt a skill-based focus for general education, practicable ways to institutionalize a skill-based curriculum, and ways to communicate the worth of general education curricula to students by focusing on how courses help students to develop critical skills they would not gain within their academic major.

B. Facilitating Cross-Disciplinary Learning from Entrepreneurial Inter-Disciplinary Projects
James Lawler, Anthony Joseph, and Arun Yegnaseshan, Pace University

The presenters of this breakout session discuss a program at a major metropolitan university that is engaging cross-disciplinary entrepreneurial students on immediate problems of society. Though housed in a school of computer science and information systems, the program is engaging experientially a mix of business, liberal arts and information systems students on multi-disciplinary projects. The objective of the program is for the students to learn multiple perspectives from students of the other schools, as members of self-directed teams, to address immediate problems in society as decided by the teams. The session will be helpful to professors considering cross-disciplinary learning on curricular entrepreneurial interdisciplinary projects.

C. Changing Strategies in Teaching for Transformative Learning
Iliana Ballester-Panelli and Alba J. Brugueras Fabre, Universidad del Sagrado Corazón

Professors Ballester-Panelli and Brugueras Fabre have been applying, optimizing, and reflecting on the use of different teaching and learning strategies in a first-year course that they have been coteaching for the last two years. This course encourages students to explore and reflect on the current economic situation of Puerto Rico and the potential alternatives for the future. The course continues with tools on the importance of personal finance and supports students in developing a personal brand as a strategy for their professional development. The breakout session will include examples and short active-exercises on how to incorporate transformative thinking strategies into the course activities and design.

D. A Theme-Based Humanities Course on Climate Change
Julie O’Connell, Felician University

Professor O’Connell developed a 200-level special topics course entitled “Climate Change: Texts and Contexts” with a goal to expose students to seminal environ- mental texts and encourage them to analyze the implicit rhetorical challenges those texts present. This session will focus on two questions: (1) how do writers and image-makers show environmental threats as both urgent (requiring immediate action) and long term (requiring sustained attention wherein results may not be immediately observable); and (2) how is the rhetorical “overstory” of ‘crisis’ embedded in all of the texts, and how might the instructor responsibly disrupt that narrative?

E. The Application of Economics through Podcasts and TED Talks in Principles of Microeconomics and Environmental Economics in a Team-Based Learning Setting
Jimena González-Ramirez, Manhattan College

Professor González-Ramirez will show the way NPR Planet Money podcast episodes and Ted Talks can be effectively employed to engage students and provide real-world applications in a Team-Based Learning (TBL) setting. She is the first to map these media to environmental economics topics, a popular economics elective that covers relevant topics such as climate change. TBL is a student-centered teaching pedagogy in which students work in diverse and permanent teams throughout the semester (Artz et al., 2016). Instead of a traditional lecture-based teaching, TBL flips the classroom and allocates substantial time to in-class application exercises. Professor González-Ramirez will show that these application exercises can be formed around NPR Planet Money and Ted talk media and offer evidence that these media have been well-received by students.

F. Transforming a Social Justice and Diversity Course Through Critical Action Research in a Creative Learning Community
Sheila Gregory, Clark Atlanta University

 

11:00 a.m.

11:15 a.m.
Break
11:15 a.m.

12:00 p.m.

 
BREAKOUT SESSION 3

 

A. STEM into STEAM: Using Object-Based Learning to Develop Critical and Creative Thinking Among Students
Amanda Valdespino and Renee Evans, Miami University

At the University of Miami, Object-Based Learning (OBL) is not only used in disciplines such as arts and humanities, but also within the sciences and engineering. The session will focus on concrete examples of instructors using OBL in the STEM classroom. Participants will engage in a learner-centered OBL activity using digital replicas of artifacts provided by University of Miami’s Lowe Art Museum. In groups, participants will answer a series of questions about each artifact which will help them to better understand how OBL works from a student’s perspective.

B. Mapping, Marking, Modernizing: Teaching Goethe in the Modern Classroom
Sven Andersen, University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras

Language and literature departments in the U.S. are facing issues ranging from budget cuts, decreased enrollments, to bored students because some courses seem to be outdated, not interesting enough, or not catering to the needs of students in the new millennium.

This session presentation will show possible ways to teach literature from centuries bygone in the modern classroom and their intrinsic value for the new generation of students. In particular, the concept of mapping for teaching the literature by J.W. Goethe will be discussed. This concept is perhaps the single most impressive form of conveying meaning to literary text.

C. Connecting Content to the World outside the Classroom in Hybrid Classes
Chiara DiSanti, Farmingdale State College

This session presentation will reflect on what students retain after graduation with a specific focus on how to enhance critical and creative thinking in online and hybrid classes while developing cultural competencies actively connecting the classroom (virtual and actual) to the world outside the university.

D. Place-based, and Experiential, Learning: How Today’s Higher Education Faculty are Changing Their Pedagogical Strategies to Mirror the New Needs of Generation Z Learners
Corey Liberman, Catherine Cabeen, Bethany Elkin, Manolo Estavillo, Millie Falcaro, and Philip Meyers, Marymount Manhattan College

This breakout session of six faculty members from six different academic areas (mathematics, photography, sociology, theatre arts, dance, and communication and media arts), will showcase how, and why, experiential learning, coupled with an interdisciplinary approach to higher education, equips students with the very knowledge that they need in order to both succeed, and excel, during their collegiate tenure and well beyond. Attendees of this breakout session will learn new strategies for both place-based learning and for infusing an interdisciplinary approach to their courses, and we, as a faculty network, will be better equipped to handle the issues that manifest when we frame learning from these different pedagogical approaches.

E. Students Challenges to Engage the Awareness of Human Resource Management Competencies Gap: Fostering Active Learning Tools
Carmen Figueroa, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez

Sandra Fonseca-Lind, Northcentral University

The changing business environment enforce undergraduate and graduate students as future human resource management professionals toward the acquisition of competencies to become a workplace advisor or strategic partner. The breakout session will focus on an article that explored students’ challenges to engage the awareness on human resources management competencies gap fostering active learning tools throughout instances of crisis. New possibilities to engage the competencies and individual/team development also brings confidence to students and becomes achievable when the instructor acts as mentor/coach and facilitator.
 

12:00 p.m.

1:00 p.m.
Lunch
1:00 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

 
POSTER SESSION

 

A. A Collaboration Across Chemistry and the Health Sciences to Enhance Forensic Science Interdisciplinary Learning
Amanda Harper-Leatherman and Linda Roney, Fairfield University

For almost three years, a chemistry professor and a nursing professor have been collaborating to offer extracurricular, interdisciplinary learning activities for science and nursing students. The collaboration between the disciplines made it possible for nursing students to not only enhance their learning about forensic nursing, but also to take part in the lab work that may occur after evidence is collected from a patient. Science students not only learned about forensic laboratory techniques, but were also exposed to the realities of caring for a potential victim of a crime. In single evening events, the collaboration between a School of Nursing and Health Studies and a Chemistry and Biochemistry Department, in addition to a Department of Public Safety helped to give students a realistic idea of how a variety of different professions work cooperatively when it comes to forensic science. The poster highlights the intellectual merit and educational value of experiential learning and cultivating interdisciplinarity in curricula.

B. Promoting Collaboration in the Classroom
Kai Burkins and Dezette Johnson, Johnson C., Smith University

As academic Professors in Social Work one of our thought patterns is how do we make sure graduate students are prepared to be culturally competent Social Workers to serve vulnerable populations. Preparation can be implemented in three ways: (1) promoting collaboration in their required internship; (2) collaborating with social work professionals and bringing them in the class to provide instruction and active learning; and (3) cross-cultural collaborations and community engagement that engage diverse and marginalized populations in ways that enhance respect for all persons and understanding of diversity and difference within the learning envi- ronment. This poster presentation will showcase how collaboration can benefit the education of students in demonstrating the ways in which internships provide an enriching collaboration with social work professionals and other disciplines to provide active learning in the field and in the classroom as well as community engagement.

C. Transforming the Classroom in Response to the COVID-19 Emergency
Jeff Gaab and Richard Vogel, Farmingdale State College

Transforming a college with over 500 full and part-time faculty members from one in which close to ninety percent of instruction was conducted in the traditional classroom to some mode of online/remote learning was challenging. A study examining the academic response seems timely. This poster presentation focuses upon three areas; (1) the various ways in which faculty from departments in the School of Business and School of Arts and Sciences responded to the emergency and transitioned, (2) what impact this may have on the college going forward, and (3) the implications for introducing new teaching modalities in the future.

 

1:30 p.m.

2:30 p.m.

 
ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION 1

 

Higher Education in the Time of COVID
 

2:30 p.m.

2:45 p.m.
Break
2:45 p.m.

3:45 p.m.

 
ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION 2

 

What Can the FRN DO for You?
Introduction: Dr. Brian Torff , Fairfield University

The study of American popular music demonstrates its strength as a cultural and political force. More than mere entertainment, it is as art of identities and human desires, revealing cultural issues in race, gender, and class while opening pathways to countercultural ways and ideas. Popular music is a contradiction in that it expresses marginalized notions within an informal exterior while appealing to a mass audience. It is an expression of freedom on multiple levels- national and individual. The fact remains that popular music’s cultural relevancy has steadily diminished since the late 1970. This is in itself is a critical issue. The discussion will demonstrate numerous examples of how interaction with FRN participants has influenced Professor Torff’s work, including a current book project of music essays examining critical issues in popular music. This session will encourage symposium participants to make their own teaching and research connections as they utilize music as a tool for promoting cultural literacy.
 

3:45 p.m.

4:00 p.m.
 
CLOSING REMARKS
 
Dr. Charlton McIlwain, Vice Provost, New York University
 
4:00 p.m.

5:00 p.m.
Social Hour

presenters

Sven-Ole Andersen

Sven-Ole Andersen

Assistant Professor of German | University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras

Professor Anderson teaches in the department of foreign languages and earned a Ph.D. from the University of Florida. His research interests include teaching methodologies, and German/American/European literatures, cultures, histories. DeutschUPR.Org

Iliana Ballester-Panelli

Iliana Ballester-Panelli

Professor | Universidad del Sagrado Corazón

Professor Ballester-Panelli teaches at the Escuela de Comunicación Ferré Rangel at the Universidad del Sagrado Corazón. She holds a B.A. in advertising from the University of the Sacred Heart and a master’s in advertising from Michigan State University. She is currently in the process of submitting her research proposal for her dissertation at Universidad Iberoamericana. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses and her research interests include the topics of distance learning, active learning, and the use of technologies for infor- mation, communication, and learning (TICAs). linkedin.com/in/ilianaballesterpanelli

Alba Brugueras-Fabre

Alba Brugueras-Fabre

Professor | Universidad del Sagrado Corazón

Professor Brugueras-Fabre is a professor in the department of business administration where she teaches courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels in microeconomics, macroeconomics, statistics, global economics, and research among others. She is also a consultant on economic affairs and market research and is a founding partner of Top Brains firm that specializes in these fields. She has a master’s degree in economics from the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras and completed doctoral studies in business administration from the same institution and in second language research from the Inter-American University of Puerto Rico. She is a collaborator of the Alliance for Education in Economics and Personal Finance, promoted by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, where she offers workshops to teachers from both the public and private systems. sagrado.edu/alba-brugueras

Kai Burkins

Kai Burkins

MSW Field Director | Johnson C. Smith University

Kai Burkins is the MSW Director of Field Education in the School of Social Work. She provides leadership and oversight of field education activities, including the development of internships and integrative field education seminar courses for the MSW program. Kai also trains and evaluates field instructors, while employing, maintaining, training and evaluating faculty field liaisons. She develops partnerships and evaluates field sites and education programs ensuring compliance with the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), educational policies and academic standards. Kai’s research interests include human trafficking and children coping with chronic illness. She received her bachelor’s degree from South Carolina State University and her Master of Social Work degree from the University of South Carolina Columbia. linkedin.com/in/kai-burkins-88a34872

Catherine Cabeen

Catherine Cabeen

Associate Professor of Dance | Marymount Manhattan College

Catherine Cabeen, MFA, is an artist and teacher based in New York City. She is a former dancer with the Bill T Jones/Arnie Zane Company, the Martha Graham Dance Company, and Richard Move’s MoveOpolis!, among others. She directed Hyphen, an interdisciplinary performance group from 2009-2019. Cabeen has created three new courses for her college; one that looks at gender representation in 20th-century dance history, one that celebrates and explores American dance history through the lens of race/racism/anti-racism, and one that focuses on the somatic experience of participating in Social Justice Movements. Cabeen has been an active member of her college’s Action Committee for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, since its inception in 2017. Cabeen also teaches at Bedford Hills Correctional Facility, a maximum-security prison for women, through her college’s prison education program. catherinecabeen.com

Chiara De Santi

Chiara De Santi

Assistant Professor | Farmingdale State College

Chiara De Santi teaches Italian language, culture, cinema, and international cinema. She received her Ph.D. in Italian from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a Ph.D. in history, and a master’s of research from the European University Institute. She also earned a Laurea Magistralis (M.A. equivalent) in Foreign Languages and Literature from the University of Florence. Her research interests include Italian and international cinema; Italian culture, gastronomy, modern literature, and history; and Italian as a second language. chiara-mente.net

Robert DiYanni

Robert DiYanni

Instructional Consultant and Adjunct Professor | New York University

Robert DiYanni conducts workshops and seminars on all aspects of pedagogy, consults with faculty about teaching concerns, visits and observes classes, and provides a wide range of pedagogical consultative services. Professor DiYanni serves on the faculties of the College of Arts and Science, the School of Professional Studies, and the Stern School of Business at New York University (NYU), where he teaches writing, literature, interdisciplinary humanities, commerce and culture, business and its publics, as well as critical and creative thinking. He earned his undergraduate degree in English from Rutgers University and received a Ph.D. in English Language and Literature from the City University of New York Graduate Center. In addition to his work at NYU, Dr. DiYanni has written and edited numerous books, primarily for college and university students, including Literature: An Introduction; The Scribner Handbook for Writers and Occasions for Writing; Arts and Culture: An Introduction to the Humanities and Handbook for the Humanities; and Modern American Poets: Their Voices and Visions. linkedin.com/in/robert-diyanni-1aab4529

Bethany Christine Elkin

Bethany Christine Elkin

Assistant Professor of Theatre Arts | Marymount Manhattan College

As a director, choreographer, performer, and educator, Bethany has worked off-Broadway, on national tours, at regional theatres, and in universities. Bethany recently worked as assistant choreographer to Josh Bergasse on Up Here at La Jolla Playhouse. She also worked on the pre-Broadway production of Secondhand Lions at the 5th Avenue Theatre with director Scott Schwartz and choreographer Josh Bergasse. Bethany directed and choreographed the first New York City revival of Songs for a New World (York Theatre). She holds a Master of Fine Arts degree in musical theatre from San Diego State University. BethanyChristineElkin.com

Amy Eshleman

Amy Eshleman

Professor of Psychology | Wagner College

Amy Eshleman regularly teaches courses on gender, sexuality, race, and class in which she shares her research on expressions of prejudice with students. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Kansas. With Jean Halley and Ramya Vijaya, Eshleman coauthored Seeing White: An Introduction to White Privilege and Race, published by Rowman & Littlefield in 2011. With Jean Halley, Eshleman co-authored Seeing Straight: An Introduction to Gender and Sexual Privilege, published by Rowman & Littlefield in 2017. wagner.edu/psychology/profile/esh

Manolo Estavillo

Manolo Estavillo

Associate Professor | Marymount Manhattan College

Manolo Estavillo is a sociologist and teaches in the department of politics and human rights. His work includes a book Gay Hegemony/Latino Homosexualities, and articles where he explores the intersection of racial difference and sexuality among men of the Puerto Rican diaspora. He teaches courses in social theory and coordinates the Gender and Sexuality Studies minor at the college. More recently, using photography as a form of creative expression and method of ethnographic documentation, he is working on a multi-year visual ethnography project to look at the relationship between space and identity in later stages of gentrification where public housing enclaves are no longer an impediment to the development of communities of luxury. Prior to his academic career, Manolo helped develop clinical programs for LGBT youth and their families at the Harvey Milk School and the Hetrick-Martin Institute in New York. mmm.edu/live/profiles/66-manolo-estavillo

Renee Evans

Renee Evans

Senior Instructional Designer | University of Miami

Renee Evans is on the Learning Innovation and Faculty Engagement team partnering with faculty members and other university stakeholders on major education initiatives, designing courses using student-centered, active learning pedagogies and innovative educational technologies. In her role, Renee does one-on-one and small group consultations with faculty, develop professional programs and facilitates workshops related to active learning methodologies. She also participates in strategic planning and evaluation of educational efforts. She holds a Master of Arts degree in instructional technology and media from Teachers College Columbia University and a Bachelor of Science degree in biochemistry from the University of the West Indies. linkedin.com/in/reneedevans

Carmen I. Figueroa-Medina

Carmen I. Figueroa-Medina

Auxiliary Professor | University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras

Professor Figueroa-Medina has 15-years of academic experience teaching human resources management in higher education. With years of leadership advising dedicated to SHRM Student Chapters (University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez), she has SHRM recognition on four SHRM Outstanding Student Chapter Merit Awards and four Superior Merit Awards at University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez Student Chapter. She has earned research recognition on graduate student mobility, the development of critical thinking competency on business administration undergraduate students, active learning, and human resource management for undergraduate students in early career development. linkedin.com/in/carmen-figueroa-9711aa71

Michael Finetti

Michael Finetti

Associate Professor of Education | Saint Peter’s University

Michael Finetti, Ed.D., is the Director of Special Education Programs and oversees the Endorsement Program for Teacher of Students with Disabilities Certification. Dr. Finetti teaches a blend of online and face-to-face graduate and undergraduate courses in the Caulfield School of Education. His research focuses on inclusive educational environments and assistive technology. saintpeters.edu/academics/faculty/members/michaelfinetti

Sandra Fonseca-Lind

Sandra Fonseca-Lind

Program Chair MSIT, Full Professor | Northcentral University

Professor Fonseca-Lind teaches and chairs the Masters of Science in Information Technology (MSIT) department and is a faculty senator, and faculty coach and mentor. ncu.edu/blog/meet-new-school-technology-professors#gref

Jeffrey Gaab

Jeffrey Gaab

Professor of History and Chair | Farmingdale State College

After earning his Bachelor’s degree from Hofstra University, and his Master’s and Ph.D. degrees from the Stony Brook University (SUNY), Dr. Gaab joined the faculty of Farmingdale State College in 1991. He has published on modern European and German history with a specialty in Bavarian history and culture. Dr. Gaab’s books include Justice Delayed: The Denzaification of the Bavarian Legal System under American Occupation 1945-1949 (Peter Lang 1999); and Munich: Hofbrauhaus and History (Peter Lang 2006). Professor Gaab was also the winner of the prestigious SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2006, as well as research fellowships from the German Academic Exchange Service and the Fulbright Agency. amazon.com/gp/product/0820442836/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_bibl_vppi_i1

Jay Garrels

Jay Garrels

Chair of Health & Physical Education | Saint Peter’s University

Dr. Garrels’ research interests include integrating best differentiated teaching strategies for higher education to enhance the learning experiences of multiple types of learners. saintpeters.edu/academics/faculty/members/jay-garrels/

Jimena González-Ramírez

Jimena González-Ramírez

Assistant Professor of Economics | Manhattan College

Jimena González-Ramírez teaches at The O’Malley School of Business at Manhattan College and is from Bogotá, Colombia. She has a Bachelor’s degree in mathematics and economics from Loras College. She obtained a Ph.D. in economics from Iowa State University and specializes in environmental and behavioral economics. Her research looks at the adoption of green behaviors and the effectiveness of nudges to promote sustainability. She also studies risk preferences and intrahousehold decisions. She uses Team-Based Learning in the classroom. jimenagonzalez.org

Amanda Harper-Leatherman

Amanda Harper-Leatherman

Professor | Fairfield University

Dr. Amanda S. Harper-Leatherman earned a B.A. in chemistry from St. Olaf College in Northfield, MN and a Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. After a post-doctoral position at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, DC, she joined the chemistry faculty of Fairfield University in 2006 and is currently a Full Professor. Her interdisciplinary scholarship includes the areas of electrochemistry, biosensing, nanomaterials, metals analysis and chemical education. She regularly mentors undergraduates in her research, many of whom go on to graduate and professional school. She has authored or co-authored 21 peer-reviewed articles or chapters and is co-editor of two American Chemical Society Symposium Series Volumes, The Science and Function of Nanomaterials: From Synthesis to Application and Teaching Chemistry with Forensic Science. facultyprofile.fairfield.edu/?uname=aharper

Anthony Joseph

Anthony Joseph

Department Chair | Pace University

Dr. Anthony Joseph is a Professor and co-chair of computer science at Pace University located in New York City. He conducts research in spectral and time frequency analyses, computational intelligence, innovation and entrepreneurship, and applied pedagogy. Some current applications include compression; prediction; computation; modeling and forecasting; statistical analysis and data analytics; assessment and evaluation; and cybersecurity.  pace.edu/seidenberg/sections/meet-the-faculty/faculty-profile/ajoseph2

Beverly Kahn

Beverly Kahn

Founding Director, RAM Program & Emeritus Professor | Farmingdale State College

Beverly Kahn is the recipient of The Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome and Fulbright Scholarships for Italy and Japan. She served as a professor of political science at the University of South Carolina and The Ohio State University for 17 years before a career in academic administration. In her 28-year career as an administrator, Beverly has focused on curriculum and pedagogy, internationalization, faculty development, academic advisement, and student retention. Since stepping aside as Provost at Farmingale, Beverly has served as professor, special project coordinator, and grant writer. She has secured more than $13 million in major grants for the College, including Title III and SSS Trio grants from the U.S. Department of Education, a Smart Grid grant from the U.S. Department of Energy, an NSF S-STEM grant, and the US Department of Education’s First in the World FIPSE Grant that has created our RAM Program. farmingdale.edu/news/news-room/2019/2019-09-04-nsf.onemilliondollars.2019.shtml

James Lawler

James Lawler

Professor | Pace University

Dr. Lawler is a Jefferson Award for Community Service Professor of disability studies and information systems in the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems of Pace University in New York City. pace.edu/seidenberg/sections/meet-the-faculty/faculty-profile/jlawler

Corey Liberman

Corey Liberman

Assistant Professor of Public Relations and Strategic Communication | Marymount Manhattan College

Corey Jay Liberman, Ph.D., teaches in the department of communication and media arts. His research spans the interpersonal communication, group communication, and organizational communication worlds, and he is currently interested in studying the social practices of dissent within organizations, specifically the antecedents, processes, and effects associated with effective employee dissent communication, as well as risk and crisis communication. He is currently working on two co-edited books, Casing Mediated Communication and Casing Nonverbal Communication, and is coauthor of Organizational Communication: Strategies for Success (2nd Edition), editor of Casing Persuasive Communication, and co-editor of Casing Crisis and Risk Communication and Casing Communication Theory, all published by Kendall Hunt. mmm.edu/live/profiles/11-corey-jay-liberman

Rosalee Martin

Rosalee Martin

Sociology Professor | Huston-Tillotson University

Dr. Rosalee Martin, has a Master in Social Work and a Ph.D. in Sociology. She also has a license in social work. She has earned numerous teaching excellence awards during her forty-eight years at Huston-Tillotson University. Her courses include Social Work, Restorative Justice, Conflict Resolution, Victimology, Internship, Minority Group relations and Addictions. Dr. Martin has presented in many FRN National Symposium, as well as participated in summer and winter seminars. Her research includes HIV—local, state and globally, racial relations, families, and mental health, among others. Currently, she is writing a book on Huston-Tillotson University. Dr. Martin is the author of many professional works, children’s books, pamphlets, and a health column in the Villager. She is also a published poet who hosts an online poetry group. htu.edu/faculty-directory/dr-rosalee-martin

Nicholas Richardson

Nicholas Richardson

Associate Provost | Wagner College

Nick research interests include the development and characterization of paramagnetic contrast agents for contrast–enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using in vitro and in vivo techniques, and more recently in chemistry education. Before his appointment as the associate provost for academic affairs in July 2018, he was a faculty member in the department of chemistry and physics. He became department chair in the fall of 2013, and the Martha Megerle endowed chair in 2017. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Toledo in the field of medicinal chemistry, and his B.Sc. from the University of Salford, England in chemistry. wagner.edu/profile/nrichard

Linda Roney

Linda Roney

Associate Professor | Fairfield University

Linda Roney, EdD, RN-BC, CPEN, CNE, is the director of the undergraduate nursing program in addition to teaching. She earned her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Villanova University. Through various roles at Yale University, Dr. Roney has provided direct care and leadership for some of the region’s most vulnerable children. With a Master of Science in Nursing Education and Doctorate of Education from Southern Connecticut State University, Dr. Roney joined Fairfield University’s Egan School of Nursing and Health Studies as a full-time faculty member in 2014. A leader in pediatric trauma nursing, Dr. Roney is involved in national education initiatives, research, and policy development focused on the care of injured children. She is currently leading an international project developing the curriculum for nurses who care for hospitalized pediatric trauma patients. Dr. Roney has been honored with the Connecticut Emergency Nurses Association Educator of the Year Award, Society of Pediatric Nurses Excellence in Education Award, the Nightingale Award, and as Nurse of the Year. facultyprofile.fairfield.edu/?uname=lroney

Maritza Soto

Maritza Soto

Professor | University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez

Dr. Maritza Soto teaches in the business administration department where she has been for almost 20 years. She is an attorney-notary duly authorized to practice law in Puerto Rico and has served as a consultant in cases related to corporate and employment law. She obtained her Juris Doctor from the Inter-American University School of Law, a doctorate in Administration and Management from Walden University, her Master’s degree in Human Resources from the Inter-American University of Puerto Rico, and her Bachelor’s degree from the University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez. As part of her professional experience, she has been a participant in the start-up of several operations in Puerto Rico in the private sector and has been director of human resources of several multinational companies. More recently, she has collaborated in training for microentrepreneurs and working directly to foster entrepreneurship in Puerto Rico with organizations such as Echar Pa’Lante and the EShip Network on the Mayagüez Campus. linkedin.com/in/maritza-soto-garcia/?originalSubdomain=pr

Alice Stephens

Alice Stephens

Associate Professor of Film and Television | Clark Atlanta University

A tenured Associate Professor of film and television at Clark Atlanta University, Dr. Alice E. Stephens teaches in the Radio/Television/Film concentration of the Department of Mass Media Arts. She holds Ph.D. in Psychology and an M.F.A in Screenwriting and Directing both from Fla. State University. Having traveled throughout the world Dr. Stephens is a global citizen who models to her students an understanding of and appreciation for global diversity. She is an Int’l Radio &Television Society (IRTS) Fellow (2019), a Dow Jones Fellow (2016), a UNCF/Mellon Fellow (2016), an Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Fellow (2006), and aFulbright Fellow (2004). An active researcher her research focuses on active and project-based learning and student engagement, visual storytelling and media literacy. Most recently she has begun to explore media portrayals of climate change. cau.edu/news/2019/02/cau-student-wins-to-prize-in-african-america-film-critics-association-build-a-film-challenge-celebrating-hbcu-legacy.html

Shiela Gregory

Sheila T. Gregory

Professor | Clark Atlanta University

Dr. Sheila T. Gregory is a full professor in the department of educational leadership and higher education at Clark Atlanta University. She is also the founder and executive director of the Institute for Scholarly Writing and Critical Thinking, working with individuals both within and outside of academia, and for profit and not for profit organizations on scholarly writing of all types. Dr. Gregory received her B.A. degree in Communications and Journalism from Oakland University, an M.P.A. degree from Wayne State University, and a Ph.D. in Higher Education Administration from the University of Pennsylvania, where she graduated with highest distinction.

Amanda Valdespino

Brian Torff

Professor of Music | Fairfield University

Brian Torff is a bassist, composer, author and educator. Currently, he is Professor of Music and Music Program Director at Fairfield University. Torff has performed with George Shearing, Frank Sinatra, Stephane Grappelli, Marian McPartland, Oliver Nelson, Mary Lou Williams, the Django Reinhart All-Stars, Tony Bennett, Cleo Laine and the Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Orchestra. He is the Musical Director and arranger for New Duke, an eight-piece horn band that was featured on the national CBS television special, “Christmas Eve at Fairfield University.” In 1992, he served as co-chairperson for the Music Advisory Board for the National Endowment for the Arts and in 2008, Torff was named Artist of the Year by the Fairfield Arts Council. In early 2008, Brian Torff lived in Paris where he wrote In Love with Voices: A Jazz Memoir. Brian Torff is currently working on a book of essays on American popular music and a new music project using beats and loops with acoustic bass. www.briantorff.com

Amanda Valdespino

Amanda Valdespino

Instructional Designer | University of Miami

Amanda Valdespino works with faculty to enrich courses through the appropriate use of technology and pedagogical techniques. In her role, Amanda performs duties such as consultations with faculty, improving on-campus courses, and experimenting with innovative models of classroom instruction. Prior to joining UM, Amanda worked for the Miami-Dade County Public Library System. There, she was in charge of the adult literacy program, where she trained volunteers, assessed adult learners, and researched best practices on adult education. Amanda earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in communications and creative writing from Florida State University (FSU). She is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in instructional systems and learning technologies at FSU. people.miami.edu/profile/axv824@miami.edu

Richard Vogel

Richard Vogel

Dean, School of Business | Farmingdale State College

Dean Richard Vogel teaches economics at Farmingdale. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from Florida International University and an MA in economics from Georgia State University. His research interests and areas include economic development, urban economic growth, natural hazards analysis, and business and economics education. He was a Fulbright Fellow teaching as a visiting professor of economics, in the department of mathematical economics at the National University of Mongolia in Ulaanbaatar in 2007. In 2019, he received the Academy of Economics and Finance Fellows award. farmingdale.edu/faculty/?fid=626

Kate Winter

Kate Winter

Evaluator | Farmingdale State College

Kate Quinn Winter, PhD, leads the team at Kate Winter Evaluation, LLC (KWE). Dr. Winter has worked with major NSF initiatives (e.g., ADVANCE, HBCU-UP, S STEM) since 2003. KWE is currently the external evaluator for the AAC&U Project Kaleidoscope (PKAL) initiative, Metacommunity for Broadening Participation; AAC&U PKAL’s Undergraduate STEM Education Reform (USER) project; two five-year long consortia-based projects funded by the U.S. Dept. of Education (a FITW and an HSI-STEM), and two NIH awards (IPERT and MOSAIC). KWE’s areas of evaluation expertise include diversity in STEM, college student access and retention, professional development for faculty, and institutional cultural change. Dr. Winter has published research findings in numerous peer-reviewed journals and is an editorial board member for the Journal of Diversity in Higher Education and an ad-hoc reviewer for the Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory & Practice. She received her PhD in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies from the University of Washington. katewinterevaluation.com/

Arun Yegnaseshan

Arun Yegnaseshan

Graduate Assistant | Pace University

Masters Student Majoring in Information Systems. Bachelors in Electronics. linkedin.com/in/arunvsgopalan/

Virtual Meetings Checklist

Please take a minute to read through the checklists below and improve your virtual experience as a convener or participant:
1. Internet Connection
  1. Test your internet speed or search for "internet speed test" and RUN SPEED TEST
    internet upload and download speeds below 25 Mbps can be an issue
    when playing back pre-recorded videos, upload speeds above 35 Mbps are recommended
  2. Close all unneeded applications
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  3. Join meetings from a location where you can use a fast, reliable, wired internet connection
    Wired connections are faster and more stable than wireless (WiFi or cellular) connections ● WiFi connections are faster and more reliable than cellular (3G/4G/LTE) connections
  4. Avoid bandwidth-intensive activities
    large downloads and large uploads, streaming video (Netflix, Hulu, YouTube...), cloud backups (Carbonite, CrashPlan...), cloud file synchronizations (OneDrive, Dropbox...)
2. SIGN IN WITH NYU ACCOUNT (SSO) :: Conveners and Hosts
  1. Sign out of all your Zoom accounts before joining a virtual program
    Sign in to the Zoom web portal > Click your profile picture in the top-right corner > Click SIGN OUT
  2. Sign in to NYU Zoom (https://nyu.zoom.us)
  3. Conveners and hosts should sign in with their NYU credentials unless prior arrangements have been made to do otherwise
  4. Test your audio, video, and breakout rooms at least 15 minutes before scheduled start time
  5. A few days before the virtual program, run a rehearsal to test your equipment, internet connection, and visual presentations
3. SIGN IN WITH Personal Account :: Participants and Guests
  1. Participants and guests should sign in with the same email address used at registration/invite
    (This will help avoid sign in errors and help manage breakout rooms more efficiently)
  2. Join virtual program 10 minutes before start time to test internet connection and set your mind at ease
  3. Test your microphone and speakers by joining a test meeting
  4. Update to the latest Zoom release for your desktop or mobile device regularly

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